Brevard County WILDLIFE EMERGENCY: 321-821-7881

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Our Mission

To provide a safe and compassionate emergency first response service for wildlife in need of urgent medical attention.

Due to the ever-increasing population and urbanization in the state of Florida, conflicts between people and wildlife are both inevitable and commonplace. Those conflicts; often resulting in life or death situations for the affected wildlife, require a rapid response by trained wildlife professionals. After recognizing the constant and increasing need for wildlife transportation and rescue, Heather Pepe Dillon and Matthew Buice Co-Founded WILD Florida Rescue, registered as a 501(c)(3) Non Profit Corporation.

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On The Horizon..

We Need Your Help!

WFR operates on the generosity of our community.

Donate through PayPal here.

We greatly appreciate donations
of any size.

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You are helping WFR rescue wildlife in need of an emergency rescue and provide first aid and care while transporting to veterinarians and rehabilitators

Services

Capture

We aim to utilize the latest methods and tools necessary to minimize stress and reduce the chances of further injury during animal rescues.

Transport

Our company is founded on the idea that a rapid pick-up and drop-off offers the greatest chance of survival for the sick and wounded.

Our 24 hour service means no animal is left to suffer.

Facebook Feed

6 hours ago

WILD Florida Rescue

WFR Debbie , Richard and Alice had quite a day trying to help out at a fox situation. A fox was running around seemingly unable to find its way out of a school yard when it hid in a drain and we were called in to help. It took a minute but the team along with John Ostrom from school Security was able to safely capture this most beautiful fox and release it just outside the nearly enclosed area. Please always keep in mind it is not legal to relocate wildlife and for good reason. There could be babies left behind or no food in an unknown habitat. Call local fish and wildlife, WFR or any rehabber should be able to answer questions you may have 👍🦝🦊🐺🐖🦨🐢🐊🐍 ...

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1 day ago

Ron Dixon

I photographed this Merganser on Saturday, 11/27 in an industrial park in Melbourne. As you can see, there appears to be an O-ring around his neck. I've left my phone number, and bird location with you. Contact me for any other information. ...

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This Osprey was brought in by WILD Florida Rescue . It seemed to be sick and just was not doing good on its own. We are happy to share that after 10 days at the hospital they were successfully released!

#WildWednesday #KeepingWildlifeWild
...

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Mrs. Redfoot lovingly keeps an eye on the wildlife in and around the pond behind her home in Vero Beach every day. On Thanksgiving, she noticed something odd on the island in the middle of the pond. She checked it out with her binoculars and realized that a turtle was stuck on its back near the water's edge. She called everyone she could think of, but no one could come out and rescue the poor turtle. Worried sick, she persevered, and was finally directed to WFR's hotline after the turtle had been stuck there for two days! WFR Jasmine (and her little ones) responded out without any further delay. She kayaked out to the island, secured the exhausted and thirsty turtle in a towel, and brought it back to the shore. Upon examining the Florida Red-Bellied Cooter, she realized it was missing its rear left leg, which had prevented it from being able to right itself after falling the way it did. After a bit of water and a rest on shore, the turtle was released and swam away! ...

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4 days ago

Ellen Florian Lopez

I came upon what I learned was a juvenile gannet who was struggling on the beach and not able to get up or fly. I called the Wildlife Rescue group and Rachel drove out 45 minutes on a Sunday night. This beautiful creature did not make it; he died in the 10 minutes I left him to meet Rachel in the parking lot. Rachel was wonderful; she examined this bird and found no visible injury and his wings, feet, body, mouth were all intact and well. His feathers and coat were beautiful. I learned that this seabird migrates from Canada and, it would seem, this juvenile's first fly did not go well and he was exhausted and we lost him. I really appreciate Rachel's help tonight. ...

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GET INVOLVED

Together, we can can protect the incredibly diverse wildlife that calls Florida home.


 

WILD Florida Rescue mailing address

1270 N. Wickham Road
Suite 16#218

Melbourne, Florida, 32935-8301

Please Note: We do not receive animal drop-offs at this address.

A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION FOR WILD Florida Rescue Corp., A FLORIDA NONPROFIT CORPORATION (REGISTRATION NUMBER: CH52014), MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL FREE 1-800-HELP-FLA (435-7352) WITHIN THE STATE OR VISITING THEIR WEBSITE HERE. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE.